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Oman sugar refinery gets under way | MEED


The project is one of Oman’s active industrial developments in the agricultural sector

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Saudi Arabia seeks firms for water reservoir PPP | MEED


More than 30 firms expressed an interest in the contract to develop the Juranah independent strategic water reservoir

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ANALYSIS: Death Batting in T20 – How Many Runs Can You Chase?

ANALYSIS: Death Batting in T20 – How Many Runs Can You Chase?


How many runs can you successfully chase batting at the death (the last 4 overs) in T20 cricket? In theory, even without no balls and wides, 6x6x4 = 144; but in reality no one has ever achieved anything like that. So what have they achieved?

We looked at over 250 matches from WBBL between 2015 and 2020 – all the games for which ball-by-ball data is available from Cricsheet – of which 119 went down to the death.

The highest successful death chase in the data we analysed was 41, but even this was a slight outlier. In reality as the batting side, you need to be chasing 38 or less from the last 4 overs to have a realistic chance of winning the match – any more than that, and the bowling side almost always wins.

On the other side of the equation, if the batting team are chasing 30 or fewer they will almost always win. This creates a Corridor of Uncertainty between 30 and 38 where the match is “in-play”, and the result could go either way.

That Corridor of Uncertainty isn’t constant however – it narrows sharply going into the final over, giving rise to the theory mentioned by Lisa Sthalekar on commentary during recent the Australia v India series that it is actually the penultimate 19th over which is the most important for the batting side.

In practice what this means is that you can go into the second-to-last over needing as many as 19, and the result will still be in-play. If you can then get this down to 8 required off the final over, you will likely win the game; but if not, 9 is almost always a losing ask. In short: if you are the batting side, don’t leave yourself with too much to do in the final over – you might be able to score 11 off the penultimate over, but you probably won’t score 11 (or even 9) off the last!

Interestingly, wickets don’t appear to have a whole lot to do with it. In matches where teams need 9-11 off the final over, they overwhelming fail; while at asks of 6-8 they almost always succeed; yet in both cases the average wickets down is the same – 5.2 – so we are seeing similar late-middle-order batters at the crease. Is it then psychological? Every batter will tell you they “back themselves” to score 9 off the final over; but do they really believe it? Studies of penalty shoot-outs in football certainly suggest a mental element to a similar situation; but the real reasons remain a matter for speculation.



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ANALYSIS: Powerplay, “Boring” Middle Overs & Death Run Rates In T20 Internationals

ANALYSIS: Powerplay, “Boring” Middle Overs & Death Run Rates In T20 Internationals


On February 21st 2020, Australia and India faced-off in the opening match of the T20 World Cup in Sydney. Batting first, India got off to a flying start, as Shafali smacked Molly Strano and Megan Schutt for 29 off 15 balls; and although India’s run rate slowed down after Shafali was dismissed right at the end of the powerplay, that explosive start had put India in the position where they would go on to win the game by 17 runs.

A strong powerplay, followed by a weaker middle overs phase, has been a typical pattern for India in recent years, even before Shafali entered the fray. In T20 matches between the “Top 5” (Australia, England, India, New Zealand and South Africa) since 2016, their average powerplay run rate has been 7.2 runs/ over, slowing down to 6.7 in the so-called “Boring” Middle Overs.

This sounds like it should be the norm – after all, it’s in the name “power” play. However, India are actually the only team in the Top 5 where this is the case – everyone else strikes at a lower run rate in the powerplay than they go on to achieve in the middle overs – even Australia, with the likes of Alyssa Healy and Beth Mooney up top.

South Africa’s opening match of that same World Cup, against England in Perth, was the complete opposite. Chasing 123, South Africa started at the pace of a funeral march, scoring at a rate of just 4.3 runs/ over in the powerplay; but came back to win the game at the death, scoring at 8.5 runs per over in the last 4 overs. (And actually it was even more “deathy” than that – they only took one run from the 17th over, hitting the required 33 off just the last 3 overs.)

Again this is a typical pattern for South Africa – they score slowly in the powerplay at 5.8 runs/ over, accelerate through the middle overs at 6.6, and then look to really make hay at the death at 7.4 runs/ over – the only team to hit at over 7 at the death.

Of course, to put things in perspective… (or as Indian and South African fans might be forgiven for thinking, “too much f****** perspective“)… cricket isn’t about winning phases; and although India and South Africa won their opening matches of that tournament, both were later beaten by Australia in the knockouts on their way to lifting the trophy at the MCG.

The middle overs might be stereotyped as “boring” but they last as long as the powerplay and death overs put together, and Australia and England, with the highest middle over run rates, ultimately make that count. It is no coincidence that the two teams who score at over 7/ over in the 10 middle overs are the ones with the highest win percentage in games between the Top 5, with a clear relationship between middle over run rate and winning games of cricket all the way down to South Africa, with a middle overs run rate of 6.6 and a win percentage of just 29%.

The middle overs might not have the glamour of the powerplay, or the cachet of the death; but they do, it seems, win you games of cricket.

Team Middle Overs RR Win %
Australia 7.6 69%
England 7.1 63%
New Zealand 6.9 41%
India 6.7 40%
South Africa 6.6 29%

All stats for fully completed (D/L excluded) T20 matches between the “Top 5”, 2016-21



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NEWS: Chester Win Title For First Time In Five Years

NEWS: Chester Win Title For First Time In Five Years


Martin Saxon reports

Chester Boughton Hall are the champions of the Cheshire Women’s Cricket League for the first time since 2016. They wasted no time in making a statement by beating 2019 champions Didsbury on the opening day, and despite a minor setback in their second match, Boughton Hall maintained their momentum, wrapping up the Championship with a match to spare.

Ali Cutler was undoubtedly a key part of their success, leading them to some of their early wins with telling contributions with both bat and ball. However, as the season progressed, some of their younger players featured more prominently, and it was 15-year-old Gemma Rose who finished as the first division’s leading wicket taker.

The best known name in the Chester squad is the Sunrisers’ opening bowler Kate Coppack, who despite now playing for a South of England elite regional team, still made the journey north to play for the club where she began her career as often as she was able to.

Didsbury won the league last time a full season was played, in 2019, but had to make do with the runners-up spot this time, as well as the Senior Knockout Cup trophy. This was despite going unbeaten in all competitions for three months at one stage, a run bookended by two league defeats against Chester.

Oakmere finished third in the first division and also won the T20 Divisional Competition for the first time.
Despite having both the leading run scorer and the equal highest wicket taker in division one, Stockport Trinity finished no higher than fourth. Ellie Mason made 752 runs over the course of the league season, at an average of 107, smashing the previous individual record. Emma Royle took 20 wickets as the club’s opening bowler.

Second division champions in 2021 were Nantwich, who are now promoted to the top flight for the first time. Quite simply, none of their divisional rivals were able to cope with their talented and varied bowling attack. Nantwich capped an excellent season by reaching the Regional Final of the National Knockout, indeed the performances of all the Cheshire League clubs that entered the National clearly demonstrate how favourably the league’s playing standards compare to other leagues in the region.

Hawarden Park and Woodley were the champions of the two regional division three competitions, Stockport Georgians 2nd XI won division four and Alvanley and Langley 2nd XI won the two division five softball competitions.

TEAM HONOURS 2021

  Winners Runners-up
Division 1 & League Championship Chester Boughton Hall Didsbury
Division 2 Nantwich Stockport Georgians
Division 3 West Hawarden Park Chester Boughton Hall 2nd XI
Division 3 East Woodley Lindow
Division 4 Stockport Georgians 2nd XI Heaton Mersey & Cheadle
Division 5 West Alvanley Leigh 2nd XI
Division 5 East Langley 2nd XI North East Cheshire
T20 Divisional Competition Oakmere Kats Didsbury Swordettes
Senior Knockout Cup Didsbury Swordettes Appleton Tigers
Development Knockout Cup Nantwich 2nd XI Hayfield

INDIVIDUAL HONOURS

  Batting Award – Most Runs Bowling Award – Most Wickets Fielding Award – Most Fielding Catches & Run Outs Wicketkeeping Award – Most Wicketkeeping Catches & Stumpings
Division 1  Ellie Mason (Stockport Trinity) Gemma Rose (Chester BH)* Sophie Connor (Oakmere) Katie Bennett (Chester BH)
Division 2 Amy Griffiths (Porthill Park 2nd XI) Sophie Morris (Upton) Molly Price (Oxton) Charlotte Neal (Nantwich)
Division 3 West Nicola Deane (Hawarden Park) Florence Seymour (Nantwich 2nd XI)* Laura Nicholls (Hawarden Park) No award – no ‘keeper attained three or more dismissals
Division 3 East Michelle Hesslegrave (Lindow) Alicia Peacock (Hayfield)* Alex Wilson (Woodley) Abby Barlow (Woodley)
Division 4 Amy Shaw (Heaton Mersey & Cheadle) Eliza Chadwick (Heaton Mersey & Cheadle) Elspeth Headridge (Hawk Green) Charlotte Appleyard (Heaton Mersey & Cheadle)
T20 Competitions Roshini Prince-Navaratnam (Didsbury Swordettes) Kerry Hartnett (Oakmere Kats) Sophie Connor (Oakmere Kats) Ruth Lomas (Hayfield)

* Bowling average used as a tie breaker where two or more bowlers tied for total wickets

The above listed players all win an award in recognition of their performances this year.

League President Di Totty has chosen Sarah McCann as the winner of this year’s President’s Award, given in recognition of an outstanding contribution to women’s cricket in Cheshire. Di says that Sarah – now stepping down from the Chair role, having done it for the last 11 years, and for another period back in the 2000s – was “the only choice” for the award this year.



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VIDEO: The CRICKETher Weekly Vodcast – Episode 81

VIDEO: The CRICKETher Weekly Vodcast – Episode 81


Not every country might want to do women’s tests over five days, but surely England and Australia would be two countries where the cricket boards and broadcasters would be OK with this? Some people are pushing for two four day Tests in bilateral series, but surely that’s just highly likely to give you two draws, and five days of women’s Test cricket in a year rather than eight might be an easier sell? Then we’d also have a much higher chance of a positive result. For the record, men’s tests don’t have to be five days either, and there have been some recent examples of four-day Tests.

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